Changing Families, Changing Food (Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life)


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Changing Families, Changing Food | P. Jackson | Palgrave Macmillan

As one of South Asia's oldest democracies Sri Lanka is a critical case to examine As one of South Asia's oldest democracies Sri Lanka is a critical case to examine the limits of a liberal peace, peacebuilding and external engagement in the settlement of civil wars. Analyzing marriage markets as they pertain to marriage has several benefits. First, marriage market conditions are forces that influence marriage from outside they subjects affect, which means they impact the general trends of marriage decisions.

In addition, Job stability benefits both employeers through greater productivity and families though more cohesion.

Foucault, the Family and Politics Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life

Second, marriage market conditions may capture many economic influences. In weak marriage markets when there is high unemployment couples who would like to get married may delay doing so due to unemployment or financial troubles. Furthermore, even couples that are already married may face doubts about the future economic status of themselves or their partners, which can create marital instability. Conversely, strong labor markets when unemployment is low may improve the employment situation and financial situation of either partner, which may facilitate marriage and increase economic stability.

Social class interacts with gender to impact the male-female dynamic in marriage, particularly with respect to "temporal flexibility at work and home". Conversely, men and women who do not have access to such flexibility and control of their time are pressured to weaken conventional gender expectations regarding marriage, family, and jobs. Gertsel and Clawson conducted a study in which they collected data from four groups of paid care workers, divided by class and gender The nurses were almost exclusively women and the doctors were almost exclusively men.

This group had a number of choices about work hours and their ability to utilize family-friendly workplace policies. The class-disadvantaged group had fewer choices regarding their work hours and faced greater constraints in flexibility and control of their time. Women in particular need flexible work hours in order to meet the inflexible demands that marriage and a family place upon them, as traditional gender expectations stipulate that the woman be the primary caregiver. Furthermore, gender shapes the particular variety of flexibility demanded.

In advantaged occupations, both men and women are able to acquire the flexibility they so desire.

However, they choose to use the control that this affords them in different manners. Women cut back on paid work hours and take leaves to handle domestic labor and child-care. In other words, they make job sacrifices. On the other hand, men are less likely to utilize family-friendly policies to make work sacrifices; they spend less at home and more time working. In essence, both men and women of class-advantaged occupations use the flexibility that their status provides them to "enact neotraditional gender expectations".

Class-disadvantaged men and women do not have the same temporal flexibility that allows them to make decisions on how to allocate their time. They face stricter constraints on their work hours and policies, thus making it impossible for them to choose whether to spend more time at work or more time at home. For example, even if a class-disadvantaged woman wanted to spend less time at work and more time with her children or in the home, she might not be able due to the inability to get time off from work or take a leave of absence.

Thus, class-disadvantage makes it more difficult for both men and women to adhere to traditional gender expectations. The researchers showed that class advantage is used to "do gender" in traditional ways, while class disadvantage may lead to a violation of traditional gender expectations in a way that "undoes gender".

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Research indicates that three principal factors predict how well men and women perceive their work-life balance in marriage: job characteristics, family characteristics, and spillover between work and family. As demonstrated by Gertsel and Clawson, higher-level occupations are generally more accommodating to family life than are lower level occupations Keene and Quadagno found a greater likelihood of perceived imbalance when work duties caused men or women to miss a family event or make it difficult to maintain their home Additional research by Keene and Quadagno suggests that the gender expectations that men should prioritize their work lives and women should prioritize their marriage and home life no longer exist.

One theoretical approach to explain this concept is the "gender similarity" approach, which "predicts that the convergence in men's and women's work and family demands should lead to a convergence in attitudes toward work and family responsibilities and feelings of work-family balance". Some research supports the convergence of men's and women's work experiences: both men and women make adjustments in their marriage and personal lives to meet their employer's expectations, while also making adjustments at work to maintain their marital and family obligations.

However, the analysis from the abovementioned study supports the gender differences model. Gender differences exist in the division of household labor and chores, with men working more hours and women spending more time on domestic and child-care responsibilities. The divorce rate in western countries has generally increased over time. Divorce rates have however started to decrease over the last twenty years. In the US, divorce rate changed from l. Many scholars have attempted to explain why humans enter relationships, stay in relationships and end relationships.

Levinger's , theory on divorce is based on a theoretical tradition consisting of three basic components: attractions, barriers and alternatives. All the things that can be seen as gains from the relationship such as love, sex, companionship, emotional support and daily assistance are the rewards of the relationship.

The costs would the negative aspects of the relationship such as domestic violence , infidelity, quarrels and limitations on personal freedom. Generally people tend to stay in high rewards and low cost relationships. However, the reverse situation, that is, a costly marriage with few benefits does not automatically lead to divorce. Couples must overcome barriers such as religious beliefs, social stigma, and financial dependence or law restrictions before they successfully dissolve their marriage.

Another theory to explain why relationships end is the "Mate ejection theory", by Brian Boutwell, J.

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Sociology of the family

Barnes and K. M Beaver. According to this theory there are gender differences in the process of ejection. For example, a woman will be more upset when her husband emotionally cheats on her and a man will be more upset when his wife physically cheats on him.

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The reason for this stems from evolutionary roots, a man emotionally cheating on his wife equates to a loss or reduction in resources for the wife to raise the children whereas an act of physical infidelity by the wife threatens the husband's chance to pass on his genes to the next generation via reproduction.

Both these circumstances call for mate ejection. Three longitudinal studies on divorce: The Marin County Project the clinical study of 60 families that began in , The Virginia County Study a series of longitudinal studies on marriage, divorce and remarriage and The Binuclear Family Studies of 98 families have helped expand the literature on divorce. Judith Wallerstein , an influential psychologist's research on the effect of divorce based on the Marin County Project , on children suggests that, "children with divorced parents often reach adulthood as psychologically troubled individuals who find it difficult to maintain satisfying relationships with others".

A lot of quantitative research done by other scholars agrees with Wallerstein's conclusion. It has been shown that the children with divorced parents have an increased risk of: experiencing psychological problems, having troubled marriages, divorcing and having poor relationships with parents especially the father. Wallerstein, however, has a disputed 'extreme version' of her theory where she claims that the difference between the children with divorced and continuously married parents is dramatic and pervasive. One such opponent of Wallerstein's extreme theory is Mavis Hetherington who argues that the negative effects of divorce on children have been exaggerated and that most children grow up without long-term harm.

Twenty years after the 98 families from the binuclear study were interviewed; the offspring from these families were interviewed.

Mothering is the social practice of nurturing and caring for dependent children. It is a dynamic process of social interactions and relationships. Mothering is typically associated with women since it is typically women who mother their children. However, "not all women mother, and mothering as nurturing and caring work is not inevitable the exclusive domain of women". The roles associated with motherhood are variable across time and culture.

The universalist approach to motherhood is aimed at conceptualizing the work that mothers do. This approach identifies mothers through what they do, rather than how they feel. Mothers share a set of activities known as "maternal practice", that are universal, even though they vary as individuals and across cultures. These activities include nurturing, protecting, and training their children. An individual's mothering actions are shaped by their beliefs about family, individuality, the nature of childhood, and the nature of their child.

These are also often shaped by their own childhood and past experiences with children. The dynamic interactions between the mother and child create deep and meaningful connections. The particularistic approach to mothering suggests that the role of a mother, their activities, and understandings cannot be separated from the context in which they live.

According to this theory, mothering takes place within " specific historical contexts framed by interlocking structures of race, class, and gender' [29] Furthermore, a mother's strategies and meanings that she develops are influenced by different social locations, such as the intersections of regional and local political economy with class, ethnicity, culture, and sexual preference.

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Motherhood ideology is influenced by the idealization of the family structure and perpetuates the image of a heterosexual couple with children. In this family model the father acts as the economic support and sometimes disciplinarian of the family, while the mother or other female relative oversees most of the child-rearing.

In East Asian and Western traditional families, fathers were the heads of the families, which meant that his duties included providing financial support and making critical decisions, some of which must have been obeyed without question by the rest of the family members. The mother's role in the family is celebrated on Mother's Day.

Changing Families, Changing Food (Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life) Changing Families, Changing Food (Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life)
Changing Families, Changing Food (Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life) Changing Families, Changing Food (Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life)
Changing Families, Changing Food (Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life) Changing Families, Changing Food (Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life)
Changing Families, Changing Food (Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life) Changing Families, Changing Food (Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life)
Changing Families, Changing Food (Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life) Changing Families, Changing Food (Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life)
Changing Families, Changing Food (Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life) Changing Families, Changing Food (Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life)
Changing Families, Changing Food (Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life) Changing Families, Changing Food (Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life)

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